Reproduction Quotient

The reproduction quotient illustrates the relative amount of total energy invested in seeking a mate or partner for life on average between both sexes. Several factors come into play when generalizing using this curve:

  • Younger people are more attractive due to the decreased expression of aging, which in turns mean that more energy expenditure will be involved in seeking a mate who is young rather than someone who is significantly older
  • Younger people have just started their lives, thus in turn means that mistakes made now are significantly less costly than those in later life (i.e. mid-life divorces)
  • Younger people are more predisposed for actively engaging in partner-seeking strategies due to developmental factors being taken into play
  • Older people have significantly more financial wealth and power (in most cases)
  • Older people in proportion to younger people are more likely to have settled down with a family or are married or are in the process of engagement and as such the energy invested for looking out on reproductive partners are reduced dramatically
  • Older individuals who are single are more likely to remain single for the rest of their life without reproducing, given the established circumstances of job security, friendships, contacts, business, etc.
  • Younger individuals are compelled, pressured to and positively reinforced by society to find suitable mates in early life
  • Typically people in their advanced ages who have already undergone divorces means that such experiences entail a behavioral effect of avoidance of investment on reproduction, given the difficulties with having children, property distribution, etc
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